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Articles tagged: Citus team

Many of you rely on databases to return correct results for your SQL queries, however complex your queries might be. And you probably place your trust with no questions asked—since you know relational databases are built on top of proven mathematical foundations, and since there is no practical way to manually verify your SQL query output anyway.

Since it is possible that a database’s implementation of the SQL logic could have a few errors, database developers apply extensive testing methods to avoid such flaws. For instance, the Citus open source repo on GitHub has more than twice as many lines related to automated testing than lines of database code. However, checking correctness for all possible SQL queries is challenging because of the lack of a “ground truth” to compare their outputs against, and the infinite number of possible SQL queries.

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Citus Data & Microsoft

Today, I’m very excited to announce the next chapter in our company’s journey: Microsoft has acquired Citus Data.

When we founded Citus Data eight years ago, the world was different. Clouds and big data were newfangled. The common perception was that relational databases were, by design, scale up only—limiting their ability to handle cloud scale applications and big data workloads. This brought the rise of Hadoop and all the other NoSQL databases people were creating at the time. At Citus Data, we had a different idea: that we would embrace the relational database, while also extending it to make it horizontally scalable, resilient, and worry-free. That instead of re-implementing the database from scratch, we would build upon PostgreSQL and its open and extensible ecosystem.

Fast forward to 2019 and today’s news: we are thrilled to join a team who deeply understands databases and is keenly focused on meeting customers where they are. Both Citus and Microsoft share a mission of openness, empowering developers, and choice. And we both love PostgreSQL. We are excited about joining forces, and the value that doing so will create: Delivering to our community and our customers the world’s best PostgreSQL experience

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Seasons each have a different feel, a different rhythm. Temperature, weather, sunlight, and traditions—they all vary by season. For me, summer usually includes a beach vacation. And winter brings the smell of hot apple cider on the stove, days in the mountains hoping for the next good snowstorm—and New Year’s resolutions. Somehow January is the time to pause and reflect on the accomplishments of the past year, to take stock in what worked, and what didn’t. And of course there are the TOP TEN LISTS.

Spoiler alert, yes, this is a Top 10 list. If you’re a regular on the Citus Data blog, you know our Citus database engineers love PostgreSQL. And one of the open source responsibilities we take seriously is the importance of sharing learnings, how-to’s, and expertise. One way we share learnings is by giving lots of conference talks (seems like I have to update our Events page every week with new events.) And another way we share our learnings is with our blog.

So just in case you missed any of our best posts from last year, here is the TOP TEN list of the most popular Citus Data blogs published in 2018. Enjoy.

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Today, we’re excited to announce that we have donated 1% of Citus Data’s stock to the non-profit PostgreSQL organizations in the US and Europe. The United States PostgreSQL Association (PgUS) has received this stock grant. PgUS will work with PostgreSQL Europe to support the growth, education, and future innovation of Postgres both in the US and Europe.

To our knowledge, this is the first time a company has donated 1% of its equity to support the mission of an open source foundation.

To coincide with this donation, we’re also joining the Pledge 1% movement, alongside well-known technology organizations such as Atlassian, Twilio, Box, and more.

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Over the last two years, our engineering team at Citus Data has shortened release cycles from 12 months all the way down to 8 weeks. The most recent 7.2 release of the Citus database took 8 weeks exactly, start to finish.

These shortened release cycles have been chock full of new capabilities for our users, including distributed deadlock detection in Citus 7.0, multi-shard updates and deletes in Citus 7.1, and support for CTE’s (common table expressions) and complex Postgres subqueries in Citus 7.2.

On the Citus Cloud side (that’s our fully-managed database as a service that runs on AWS), we’ve recently added fork, followers, fully-online “warp” migration from existing PostgreSQL installations, and point-in-time-recovery (PITR), just to name a few.

When I step back to think about how we got here (as a co-founder of Citus Data, I’ve been here since the beginning), it’s no surprise that I attribute much of what we’ve accomplished to our team. But here’s the point about all these accomplishments that I think is so interesting: our engineering team is distributed across 5 countries and 6 different cities.

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Sumedh Pathak

PostgreSQL Expert Dimitri Fontaine joins Citus Data

Written byBy Sumedh Pathak | January 12, 2018Jan 12, 2018

Dimitri Fontaine bio pic

Dimitri Fontaine. Photo by Oleg Bartunov

My colleagues at Citus Data and I are super excited to announce that Dimitri Fontaine is joining the Citus Data team. Dimitri is a Major Contributor to the PostgreSQL development project and has authored (and still maintains) key components in the PostgreSQL ecosystem, including the extension framework, pgloader and event triggers, to name a few.

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Top 10 Most Popular Citus Data Blog Posts in 2017 cover image

What Postgres and distributed database topics got the most attention on our Citus Data blog in 2017? Out of the 47 new posts we published last year, it’s pretty clear that many of you were interested in sharding relational databases, whether it be Ozgun’s principles of sharding or Craig’s post on figuring out which sharding data model is right for you. Heck, the five sharding data models post was so popular that it even got re-published recently on HackerNoon.

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A key part of running a reliable database service is ensuring you have a good plan for disaster recovery. Disaster recovery comes into play when disks or instances fail, and you need to be able to recover your data. In those type of cases logical backups, via pg_dump, may be days old and in such cases not ideal for you to restore from. To remove the risk of data loss, many of us turn to the Postgres WAL to keep safe.

Years ago Daniel Farina, now a principal engineer at Citus Data, authored a continuous archiving utility to make it easy for Postgres users to prepare for and recover from disasters. The tool, WAL-E, has been used to keep millions of Postgres databases safe. Today we’re excited to introduce an exciting new version of this tool: WAL-G. WAL-G, the successor to WAL-E, was created by a software engineering intern here at Citus Data, Katie Li, who is an undergraduate at UC Berkeley.

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