If you want to learn more about Citus on Microsoft Azure, read this post about Hyperscale (Citus) on Azure Database for PostgreSQL.

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Citus Blog

Articles tagged: rails

Lukas Fittl

Managing multiple databases in Rails 6

Written byBy Lukas Fittl | May 23, 2019May 23, 2019

If you’ve worked with Ruby on Rails you likely have some understanding of how your database works with Rails, traditionally that has always meant specifying a single database per environment in your config/database.yml, possibly together with an environment setting like DATABASE_URL. Based on that configuration all reads and writes will access the database.

With Rails 6 this is about to change, thanks to the work of Eileen M. Uchitelle together with contributors from GitHub, Basecamp and Shopify. In the upcoming Rails 6 (currently in RC1), you will be able to easily change which database server you are connecting to, to support a variety of scenarios such as using read replicas and splitting your database into dedicated components.

The most interesting part, which we wanted to detail in this post, is related to configuring automatic queries against a read replicas, or follower database.

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“Thirty years ago, my older brother was trying to get a report on birds written that he’d had three months to write. It was due the next day.

We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds, immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead. Then my father sat down beside him, put his arm around my brother’s shoulder, and said, ‘Bird by bird, buddy. Just take it bird by bird.’”

Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life, by Anne LaMott

When we started working on Citus, our vision was to combine the power of relational databases with the elastic scale of NoSQL. To do this, we took a different approach. Instead of building a new database from scratch, we leveraged PostgreSQL’s new extension APIs. This way, Citus would make Postgres a distributed database and integrate with the rich ecosystem of tools you already use.

When PostgreSQL is involved, executing on this vision isn’t a simple task. The PostgreSQL manual offers 3,558 pages of features built over two decades. The tools built around Postgres use and combine these features in unimaginable ways.

After our Citus open source announcement, we talked to many of you about scaling out your relational database. In every conversation, we’d hear about different Postgres features that needed to scale out of the box. We’d take notes from our meeting and add these features into an internal document. The list would keep getting longer, and longer, and longer.

Like the child writing a report on birds, the task ahead felt insurmountable. So how do you take a solid relational database and make sure that all those complex features scale? You take it bird by bird. We broke down the problem of scaling into five hundred smaller ones and started implementing these features one by one.

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Lukas Fittl

Postgres tips for Rails developers

Written byBy Lukas Fittl | April 28, 2017Apr 28, 2017

This week at RailsConf, we found ourselves sharing a lot of tips for using PostgreSQL with Rails. We thought it might be worthwhile to write up many of these and share more broadly. Here you’ll find some tips that will help you in debugging and improving performance of your database from your Rails app.

And now, on to the code.

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Lukas Fittl

Scale Out Multi-Tenant Apps based on Ruby on Rails

Written byBy Lukas Fittl | January 5, 2017Jan 5, 2017

Today we’re happy to announce our new activerecord-multi-tenant Ruby library, which enables easy scale-out of applications that are built on top of Ruby on Rails and follow a multi-tenant data model.

This Ruby library has evolved from our experience working with customers, scaling out their multi-tenant apps, and patching some restrictions that ActiveRecord and Rails currently have when it comes to automatic query building. It is based on the excellent acts_as_tenant library, and extends it for the particular use-case of a distributed multi-tenant database like Citus.

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