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Articles tagged: popular

When working on the internals of Citus, an open source extension to Postgres that transforms Postgres into a distributed database, we often get to talk with customers that have interesting challenges you won’t find everywhere. Just a few months back, I encountered an analytics workload that was a really good fit for Citus.

But we had one problem: the percentile calculations on their data (over 300 TB of data) could not meet their SLA of 30 seconds.

To make things worse, the query performance was not even close to the target: the percentile calculations were taking about 6 minutes instead of the required 30 second SLA.

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Marco Slot

What’s new in the Citus 9.4 extension to Postgres

Written byBy Marco Slot | September 5, 2020Sep 5, 2020

Our latest release to the Citus extension to Postgres is Citus 9.4. If you’re not yet familiar, Citus transforms Postgres into a distributed database, distributing your data and your SQL queries across multiple nodes. This post is basically the Citus 9.4 release notes.

If you’re ready to get started with Citus, it’s easy to download Citus open source packages for 9.4.

I always recommend people check out docs.citusdata.com to learn more. The Citus documentation has rigorous tutorials, details on every Citus feature, explanations of key concepts—things like choosing the distribution column—tutorials on how you can set up Citus locally on a single server, how to install Citus on multiple servers, how to build a real-time analytics dashboard, how to build a multi-tenant database, and more…

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This year, I was so excited about doing a workshop about optimizing Python & Django apps with Postgres superpowers for the PyCon 2020 conference.

Working with other developers on performance is something I always find amazing. So props to the Python people at Microsoft who encouraged my team to create a workshop on Postgres for PyCon 2020. Thank you to Nina Zakharenko, Dan Taylor, & Crystal Kelch.

Alas, we had to change our plans and find other ways to share the PostgreSQL workshop content that we had prepared. So I created a video on the topic of database performance for Django developers, to help teach you the PostgreSQL tips and tricks that have served me well in optimizing my Django apps. These tips are what I call “Postgres superpowers.”

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Craig Kerstiens

The most useful Postgres extension: pg_stat_statements

Written byBy Craig Kerstiens | February 8, 2019Feb 8, 2019

Extensions are capable of extending, changing, and advancing the behavior of Postgres. How? By hooking into low level Postgres API hooks. The open source Citus database that scales out Postgres horizontally is itself implemented as a PostgreSQL extension, which allows Citus to stay current with Postgres releases without lagging behind like other Postgres forks. I’ve previously written about the various types of extensions, today though I want to take a deeper look at the most useful Postgres extension: pg_stat_statements.

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Seasons each have a different feel, a different rhythm. Temperature, weather, sunlight, and traditions—they all vary by season. For me, summer usually includes a beach vacation. And winter brings the smell of hot apple cider on the stove, days in the mountains hoping for the next good snowstorm—and New Year’s resolutions. Somehow January is the time to pause and reflect on the accomplishments of the past year, to take stock in what worked, and what didn’t. And of course there are the TOP TEN LISTS.

Spoiler alert, yes, this is a Top 10 list. If you’re a regular on the Citus Data blog, you know our Citus database engineers love PostgreSQL. And one of the open source responsibilities we take seriously is the importance of sharing learnings, how-to’s, and expertise. One way we share learnings is by giving lots of conference talks (seems like I have to update our Events page every week with new events.) And another way we share our learnings is with our blog.

So just in case you missed any of our best posts from last year, here is the TOP TEN list of the most popular Citus Data blogs published in 2018. Enjoy.

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Craig Kerstiens

Configuring memory for Postgres

Written byBy Craig Kerstiens | June 12, 2018Jun 12, 2018

work_mem is perhaps the most confusing setting within Postgres. work_mem is a configuration within Postgres that determines how much memory can be used during certain operations. At its surface, the work_mem setting seems simple: after all, work_mem just specifies the amount of memory available to be used by internal sort operations and hash tables before writing data to disk. And yet, leaving work_mem unconfigured can bring on a host of issues. What perhaps is more troubling, though, is when you receive an out of memory error on your database and you jump in to tune work_mem, only for it to behave in an un-intuitive manner.

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If you’ve done some performance tuning with Postgres, you might have used EXPLAIN. EXPLAIN shows you the execution plan that the PostgreSQL planner generates for the supplied statement. It shows how the table(s) referenced by the statement will be scanned (using a sequential scan, index scan etc), and what join algorithms will be used if multiple tables are used. But, how does Postgres come up with these plans?

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Marco Slot

When Postgres blocks: 7 tips for dealing with locks

Written byBy Marco Slot | February 22, 2018Feb 22, 2018

Last week I wrote about locking behaviour in Postgres, which commands block each other, and how you can diagnose blocked commands. Of course, after the diagnosis you may also want a cure. With Postgres it is possible to shoot yourself in the foot, but Postgres also offers you a way to stay on target. These are some of the important do’s and don’ts that we’ve seen as helpful when working with users to migrate from their single node Postgres database to Citus or when building new real-time analytics apps on Citus.

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Marco Slot

PostgreSQL rocks, except when it blocks: Understanding locks

Written byBy Marco Slot | February 15, 2018Feb 15, 2018

On the Citus open source team, we engineers take an active role in helping our users scale out their Postgres database, be it for migrating an existing application or building a new application from scratch. This means we help you with distributing your relational data model—and also with getting the most out of Postgres.

One problem I often see users struggle with when it comes to Postgres is locks. While Postgres is amazing at running multiple operations at the same time, there are a few cases in which Postgres needs to block an operation using a lock. You therefore have to be careful about which locks your transactions take, but with the high-level abstractions that PostgreSQL provides, it can be difficult to know exactly what will happen. This post aims to demystify the locking behaviors in Postgres, and to give advice on how to avoid common problems.

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Joe Kutner

Using Hibernate and Spring to Build Multi-Tenant Java Apps

Written byBy Joe Kutner | February 13, 2018Feb 13, 2018

If you’re building a Java app, there’s a good chance you’re using Hibernate. The Hibernate ORM is a nearly ubiquitous choice for Java developers who need to interact with a relational database. It’s mature, widely supported, and feature rich—as demonstrated by its support for multi tenant applications.

Hibernate officially supports two different multi-tenancy mechanisms: separate database and separate schema. Unfortunately, both of these mechanisms come with some downsides in terms of scaling. A third Hibernate multi-tenancy mechanism, a tenant discriminator, also exists, and it’s usable—but it’s still considered a work-in-progress by some. Unlike the separate database and separate schema approaches, which require distinct database connections for each tenant, Hibernate’s tenant discriminator model stores tenant data in a single database and partitions records with either a simple column value or a complex SQL formula.

But fear not, despite the unfinished state of Hibernate’s built-in support for a tenant discriminator (or in simple terms tenant_id), it’s possible to implement your own discriminator using standard Spring, Hibernate, and AspectJ mechanisms that work quite well. The Hibernate tenant discriminator model works well as you start small on a single-node Postgres database, and even better, tenant discriminator can continue to scale as your data grows by leveraging the Citus extension to Postgres.

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