Citus Blog

Articles tagged: Citus on Azure

My main advice when running performance benchmarks for Postgres is: “Automate it!”

If you’re measuring database performance, you are likely going to have to run the same benchmark over and over again. Either because you want a slightly different configuration, or because you realized you used some wrong settings, or maybe some other reason. By automating the way you’re running performance benchmarks, you won’t be too annoyed when this happens, because re-running the benchmarks will cost very little effort (it will only cost some time).

However, building this automation for the database benchmarks can be very time-consuming, too. So, in this post I’ll share the tools I built to make it easy to run benchmarks against Postgres—specifically against the Citus extension to Postgres running in a managed database service on Azure called Hyperscale (Citus) in Azure Database for PostgreSQL.

Here’s your map for reading this post: each anchor link takes you to a different section. The first sections explore the different types of application workloads and their characteristics, plus the off-the-shelf benchmarks that are commonly used for each. After that you can dive into the “how to” aspects of using HammerDB with Citus and Postgres on Azure. And yes, you’ll see some sample benchmarking results, too.

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Claire Giordano

UK COVID-19 dashboard built using Postgres and Citus for millions of users

Written byBy Claire Giordano & Pouria Hadjibagheri | December 11, 2021Dec 11, 2021

From the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the United Kingdom (UK) government has made it a top priority to track key health metrics and to share those metrics with the public.

And the citizens of the UK were hungry for information, as they tried to make sense of what was happening. Maps, graphs, and tables became the lingua franca of the pandemic. As a result, the GOV.UK Coronavirus dashboard became one of the most visited public service websites in the United Kingdom.

The list of people who rely on the UK Coronavirus dashboard is quite long: government personnel, public health officials, healthcare employees, journalists, and the public all use the same service.

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Today, we are excited to announce PostgreSQL 14’s General Availability (GA) on Azure’s Hyperscale (Citus) option. To our knowledge, this is the first time a major cloud provider has announced GA for a new Postgres major version on their platform one day after the official release.

Starting today, you can deploy Postgres 14 in many Hyperscale (Citus) regions. In upcoming months, we will roll out Postgres 14 across more Azure regions and also release it with our new Flexible Server option in Azure Database for PostgreSQL.

This announcement helps us bring the latest in Postgres to Azure customers as new features become available. Further, it shows our commitment to open source PostgreSQL and its ecosystem. We choose to extend Postgres and share our contributions, instead of creating and managing a proprietary fork on the cloud.

In this blog post, you’ll first get a glimpse into some of our favorite features in Postgres 14. These include connection scaling, faster VACUUM, and improvements to crash recovery times.

We’ll then describe the work involved in making Postgres extensions compatible with new major Postgres versions, including our distributed database Citus as well as other extensions such as HyperLogLog (HLL), pg_cron, and TopN. Finally, you’ll learn how packaging, testing, and deployments work on Hyperscale (Citus). This last part ties everything together and enables us to release new versions on Azure, with speed.

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There is some good news for those of you wanting to shard your Postgres database in the cloud, so that as your data grows you have an easy way to scale out your Postgres database. I’m delighted to announce that Citus 10—the latest open source release of the Citus extension to Postgres—is now generally available in Hyperscale (Citus).

Hyperscale (Citus) is a built-in option in the Azure Database for PostgreSQL managed service, which has been around for a couple of years to help those of you who would rather focus on your application—and not on spending cycles managing your database.

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It’s been an eventful time for Hyperscale (Citus) lately. If you’re interested in Postgres, distributed databases, and how to handle ever growing needs for your Postgres application or simply use Hyperscale (Citus), keep reading.

Citus is an open source extension to Postgres that enables horizontal scaling of your Postgres database. Citus distributes your Postgres tables, writes, and SQL queries across multiple nodes—parallelizing your workload and enabling you to use the memory, compute, and disk of a multi-node cluster. And Citus is available on Azure: Hyperscale (Citus) is a deployment option in Azure Database for PostgreSQL.

What’s really exciting to me is that we’ve made it easier and cheaper than ever to try and use Hyperscale (Citus). With Basic tier, you can now use Hyperscale (Citus) on a single node, parallelizing your operations and adopting a distributed database model from the very beginning. And you can now try Citus open source with a single docker run command—boom!

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Citus is an extension to Postgres that lets you distribute your application’s workload across multiple nodes. Whether you are using Citus open source or using Citus as part of a managed Postgres service in the cloud, one of the first things you do when you start using Citus is to distribute your tables. While distributing your Postgres tables you need to decide on some properties such as distribution column, shard count, colocation. And even before you decide on your distribution column (sometimes called a distribution key, or a sharding key), when you create a Postgres table, your table is created with an access method.

Previously you had to decide on these table properties up front, and then you went with your decision. Or if you really wanted to change your decision, you needed to start over. The good news is that in Citus 10, we introduced 2 new user-defined functions (UDFs) to make it easier for you to make changes to your distributed Postgres tables.

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Sai Krishna Srirampur

Faster data migrations in Postgres

Written byBy Sai Srirampur | February 20, 2021Feb 20, 2021

In my day to day, I get to work with many customers migrating their data to Postgres. I work with customers migrating from homogenous sources (PostgreSQL) and also from heterogenous database sources such as Oracle and Redshift. Why do people pick Postgres? Because of the richness of PostgreSQL—and features like stored procedures, JSONB, PostGIS for geospatial workloads, and the many useful Postgres extensions, including my personal favorite: Citus.

A large chunk of the migrations that I help people with are homogenous Postgres-to-Postgres data migrations to the cloud. As Azure Database for PostgreSQL runs open source Postgres, in many cases the application migration can be drop-in and doesn’t require a ton effort. The majority of the effort usually goes into deciding on and implementing the right strategy for performing the data migration.

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Once you start using the Citus extension to distribute your Postgres database, you may never want to go back. But what if you just want to experiment with Citus and want to have the comfort of knowing you can go back? Well, as of Citus 9.5, now there is a new undistribute_table() function to make it easy for you to, well, to revert a distributed table back to being a regular Postgres table.

If you are familiar with Citus, you know that Citus is an open source extension to Postgres that distributes your data (and queries) to multiple machines in a cluster—thereby parallelizing your workload and scaling your Postgres database horizontally. When you start using Citus—whether you’re using Citus open source or whether you’re using Citus as part of a managed service in the cloud—usually the first thing you need to do is distribute your Postgres tables across the cluster.

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Claire Giordano

When to use Hyperscale (Citus) to scale out Postgres

Written byBy Claire Giordano | December 5, 2020Dec 5, 2020

If you’ve built your application on Postgres, you already know why so many people love Postgres.

And if you’re new to Postgres, the list of reasons people love Postgres is loooong—and includes things like: 3 decades of database reliability baked in; rich datatypes; support for custom types; myriad index types from B-tree to GIN to BRIN to GiST; support for JSON and JSONB from early days; constraints; foreign data wrappers; rollups; the geospatial capabilities of the PostGIS extension, and all the innovations that come from the many Postgres extensions.

But what to do if your Postgres database gets very large?

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In my work as an engineer on the Postgres team at Microsoft, I get to meet all sorts of customers going through many challenging projects. One recent database migration project I worked on is a story that just needs to be told. The customer—in the retail space—was using Redshift as the data warehouse and Databricks as their ETL engine. Their setup was deployed on AWS and GCP, across different data centers in different regions. And they’d been running into performance bottlenecks and also was incurring unnecessary egress cost.

Specifically, the amount of data in our customer’s analytic store was growing faster than the compute required to process that data. AWS Redshift was not able to offer independent scaling of storage and compute—hence our customer was paying extra cost by being forced to scale up the Redshift nodes to account for growing data volumes. To address these issues, they decided to migrate their analytics landscape to Azure.

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