Citus 10.1 is out! 10.1 builds on top of all the great columnar, single-node, and shard rebalancer features in Citus 10. Read the new Citus 10.1 blog.

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Articles tagged: big announcements

Jeff Davis

Citus 10 brings columnar compression to Postgres

Written byBy Jeff Davis | March 6, 2021Mar 6, 2021

Citus 10 is out! Check out the Citus 10 blog post for all the details. Citus is an open source extension to Postgres (not a fork) that enables scale-out, but offers other great features, too. See the Citus docs and the Citus github repo and README.

This post will highlight Citus Columnar, one of the big new features in Citus 10. You can also take a look at the columnar documentation. Citus Columnar can be used with or without the scale-out features of Citus.

Postgres typically stores data using the heap access method, which is row-based storage. Row-based tables are good for transactional workloads, but can cause excessive IO for some analytic queries.

Columnar storage is a new way to store data in a Postgres table. Columnar groups data together by column instead of by row; and compresses the data, too. Arranging data by column tends to compress well, and it also means that queries can skip over columns they don’t need. Columnar dramatically reduces the IO needed to answer a typical analytic query—often by 10X!

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Development on Citus first started around a decade ago and once a year we release a major new Citus open source version. We wanted to make number 10 something special, but I could not have imagined how truly spectacular this release would become. Citus 10 extends Postgres (12 and 13) with many new superpowers:

  • Columnar storage for Postgres: Compress your PostgreSQL and Citus tables to reduce storage cost and speed up your analytical queries.
  • Sharding on a single Citus node: Make your single-node Postgres server ready to scale out by sharding tables locally using Citus.
  • Shard rebalancer in Citus open source: We have open sourced the shard rebalancer so you can easily add Citus nodes and rebalance your cluster.
  • Joins and foreign keys between local PostgreSQL tables and Citus tables: Mix and match PostgreSQL and Citus tables with foreign keys and joins.
  • Functions to change the way your tables are distributed: Redistribute your tables in a single step using new alter table functions.
  • Much more: Better naming, improved SQL & DDL support, simplified operations.

These new capabilities represent a fundamental shift in what Citus is and what Citus can do for you.

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Ozgun Erdogan

Microsoft Azure Welcomes PostgreSQL Committers

Written byBy Ozgun Erdogan | March 3, 2020Mar 3, 2020

Interview with the Postgres committers who have joined the Postgres team at Microsoft by Sudhakar Sannakkayala (Partner Director, Azure Data) and Ozgun Erdogan (Principal, Azure Data)—cross-posted from the Azure Database for PostgreSQL Blog.

In recent years, the data landscape has seen strong innovation as a result of the onset of open source technologies. At the forefront, PostgreSQL has shown that it’s the open source database built for every type of developer. By staying true to its principles of being standards-compliant, highly programmable, and extensible, PostgreSQL has solidified its position as the “most loved database” of developers across the board—ranging from scenarios for OLTP, analytics, and business intelligence to processing various formats of geometric data using the PostGIS extension.

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For roughly ten years now, I’ve had the pleasure of running and managing databases for people. In the early stages of building an application you move quickly, adding new tables and columns to your Postgres database to support new functionality. You move quickly, but you don’t worry too much because things are fast and responsive–largely because your data is small. Over time your application grows and matures. Your data model stabilizes, and you start to spend more time tuning and tweaking to ensure performance and stability stay where they need to. Eventually you get to the point where you miss the days of maintaining a small database, because life was easier then. Indexes were created quickly, joins were fast, count(*) didn’t bring your database to a screeching halt, and vacuum was not a regular part of your lunchtime conversation. As you continue to tweak and optimize the system, you know you need a plan for the future and know how you’re going to continue to scale.

Now in GA: Introducing Hyperscale (Citus) on Azure Database for PostgreSQL

With Hyperscale (Citus) on Azure Database for PostgreSQL, we help many of those worries fade away. I am super excited to announce that Citus is now available on Microsoft Azure, as a new built-in deployment option on the Azure Database for PostgreSQL called Hyperscale (Citus).

Hyperscale (Citus) scales out your data across multiple physical nodes, with the underlying data being sharded into much smaller bits. The same database sharding principles that work for Facebook and Google are baked right into the database. But, unlike traditional sharded systems, your application doesn’t have to learn how to shard the data. With Azure Database for PostgreSQL, Hyperscale (Citus) takes Postgres, the open source relational database, and extends it with low level internal hooks.

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Citus Data & Microsoft

Today, I’m very excited to announce the next chapter in our company’s journey: Microsoft has acquired Citus Data.

When we founded Citus Data eight years ago, the world was different. Clouds and big data were newfangled. The common perception was that relational databases were, by design, scale up only—limiting their ability to handle cloud scale applications and big data workloads. This brought the rise of Hadoop and all the other NoSQL databases people were creating at the time. At Citus Data, we had a different idea: that we would embrace the relational database, while also extending it to make it horizontally scalable, resilient, and worry-free. That instead of re-implementing the database from scratch, we would build upon PostgreSQL and its open and extensible ecosystem.

Fast forward to 2019 and today’s news: we are thrilled to join a team who deeply understands databases and is keenly focused on meeting customers where they are. Both Citus and Microsoft share a mission of openness, empowering developers, and choice. And we both love PostgreSQL. We are excited about joining forces, and the value that doing so will create: Delivering to our community and our customers the world’s best PostgreSQL experience.

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Today, we’re excited to announce that we have donated 1% of Citus Data’s stock to the non-profit PostgreSQL organizations in the US and Europe. The United States PostgreSQL Association (PgUS) has received this stock grant. PgUS will work with PostgreSQL Europe to support the growth, education, and future innovation of Postgres both in the US and Europe.

To our knowledge, this is the first time a company has donated 1% of its equity to support the mission of an open source foundation.

To coincide with this donation, we’re also joining the Pledge 1% movement, alongside well-known technology organizations such as Atlassian, Twilio, Box, and more.

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Craig Kerstiens

Introducing Citus Cloud

Written byBy Craig Kerstiens | April 19, 2016Apr 19, 2016

At Citus we believe in making databases easier. Key to that is empowering users to scale Postgres beyond the typical limits of a single node. Our latest Citus release makes it easier than ever to scale memory and processors while retaining access to familiar SQL queries and rich Postgres features. But database management can be tricky even in the single-node case, so we at Citus have been hard at work building the next step in our journey to make databases easier: Citus Cloud, an on-demand cloud service on top of Amazon Web Services available today in private beta. *Citus Cloud is now fully GA, you can learn more here

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