If you want to learn more about Citus on Microsoft Azure, read this post about Hyperscale (Citus) on Azure Database for PostgreSQL.

Skip navigation

Citus Blog

Articles tagged: tips

This year, I was so excited about doing a workshop about optimizing Python & Django apps with Postgres superpowers for the PyCon 2020 conference.

Working with other developers on performance is something I always find amazing. So props to the Python people at Microsoft who encouraged my team to create a workshop on Postgres for PyCon 2020. Thank you to Nina Zakharenko, Dan Taylor, & Crystal Kelch.

Alas, we had to change our plans and find other ways to share the PostgreSQL workshop content that we had prepared. So I created a video on the topic of database performance for Django developers, to help teach you the PostgreSQL tips and tricks that have served me well in optimizing my Django apps. These tips are what I call “Postgres superpowers.”

Keep reading
Claire Giordano

Tips on how to get your conference talk SELECTED

Written byBy Claire Giordano | January 16, 2020Jan 16, 2020

As I get ready for the PgDay San Francisco event that is happening next Tue 21 January—a one-day, single-track Postgres community event at the awesome Swedish American Hall in SF—I’m reflecting a bit on how important the speakers are to developer events. Let’s face it, without speakers, there would be no conference.

And because I was on the PgDaySF talk selection committee, I’ve had some good conversations these last few months about CFPs, conference talks, how talk selection committees work, and how you can improve your chances at getting your proposals accepted. So I thought it would be useful to walk through the tips I’ve accumulated on how to get your conference talk accepted—at a Postgres conference, or at any developer conference.

These tips are premised on the notion that a good conference talk requires these 4 things:

  1. interestingness: a topic people will care about—and learn from
  2. knowledgeable speaker who knows their subject & can communicate effectively with an audience—so people can follow, understand, and learn
  3. a hook: a compelling title & abstract that will hook people and entice them to attend
  4. fits holistically into the rest of the lineup: a talk that complements the rest of the talks at the event, that adds something unique, and doesn’t overlap the other talks in a significant way
Keep reading
Craig Kerstiens

Postgres tips for the average and power user

Written byBy Craig Kerstiens | July 17, 2019Jul 17, 2019

Personally I’m a big fan of email, just like blogging. To me a good email thread can be like a good novel where you’re following along always curious for what comes next. And no, I don’t mean the ones where there is an email to [email protected] and someone replies all, to only receive reply-all’s to not reply-all. I mean ones like started last week internally among the Azure Postgres team.

The first email was titled: Random Citus development and psql tips, and from there it piled on to be more and more tips and power user suggestions for Postgres. Some of these tips are relevant if you’re working directly on the Citus open source code, others relevant as anyone that works with Postgres, and some useful for debugging Postgres internals. While the thread is still ongoing here is just a few of the great tips:

Keep reading
Lukas Fittl

Managing multiple databases in Rails 6

Written byBy Lukas Fittl | May 23, 2019May 23, 2019

If you’ve worked with Ruby on Rails you likely have some understanding of how your database works with Rails, traditionally that has always meant specifying a single database per environment in your config/database.yml, possibly together with an environment setting like DATABASE_URL. Based on that configuration all reads and writes will access the database.

With Rails 6 this is about to change, thanks to the work of Eileen M. Uchitelle together with contributors from GitHub, Basecamp and Shopify. In the upcoming Rails 6 (currently in RC1), you will be able to easily change which database server you are connecting to, to support a variety of scenarios such as using read replicas and splitting your database into dedicated components.

The most interesting part, which we wanted to detail in this post, is related to configuring automatic queries against a read replicas, or follower database.

Keep reading
Craig Kerstiens

A health check playbook for your Postgres database

Written byBy Craig Kerstiens | March 29, 2019Mar 29, 2019

I talk with a lot of folks that set their database up, start working with it, and then are surprised by issues that suddenly crop up out of nowhere. The reality is, so many don’t want to have to be a DBA, instead you would rather build features and just have the database work. But your is that a database is a living breathing thing. As the data itself changes what is the right way to query and behave changes. Making sure your database is healthy and performing at it’s maximum level doesn’t require a giant overhaul constantly. In fact you can probably view it similar to how you approach personal health. Regular check-ups allow you to make small but important adjustments without having to make dramatic life altering changes to keep you on the right path.

After years of running and managing literally millions of Postgres databases, here’s my breakdown of what your regular Postgres health check should look like. Consider running this on a monthly basis to be able to make small tweaks and adjustments and avoid the drastic changes.

Keep reading
Craig Kerstiens

How to evaluate your next database

Written byBy Craig Kerstiens | March 20, 2019Mar 20, 2019

Choosing a database isn’t something you do every day. You generally choose it once for a project, then don’t look back. If you experience years of success with your application you one day have to migrate to a new database, but that occurs years down the line. In choosing a database there are a few key things to consider. Here is your checklist, and spoiler alert, Postgres checks out strongly in each of these categories.

Keep reading
Craig Kerstiens

Fun with SQL: Text and system functions

Written byBy Craig Kerstiens | March 13, 2019Mar 13, 2019

SQL by itself is great and powerful, and Postgres supports a broad array of more modern SQL including things like window functions and common table expressions. But rarely do I write a query where I don’t want to tweak or format the data I’m getting back out of the database. Thankfully Postgres has a rich array of functions to help with converting or formatting data. These built-in functions save me from having to do the logic elsewhere or write my own functions, in other words I have to do less work because Postgres has already done it for me which I’m always happy about.

We’ve covered a set of functions earlier, today we’re going to look at some different categories of functions to dive deeper.

Keep reading
Craig Kerstiens

Fun with SQL: Self joins

Written byBy Craig Kerstiens | January 2, 2019Jan 2, 2019

Various families have various traditions in the US around Christmas time. Some will play games like white elephant where you get a mix of decent gifts as well as gag gifts… you then draw numbers and get to pick from existing presents that have been opened (“stealing” from someone else) or opening an up-opened one. The game is both entertaining to try to get something you want, but also stick Aunt Jennifer with the stuffed poop emoji with a Santa hat on it.

Other traditions are a bit simpler, one that my partner’s family follows is drawing names for one person you buy a gift for. This is nice because you can put a bit of effort into that one person without having to be too overwhelmed in tracking down things for multiple people. Each year we draw names for the next year. And by now you’re probably thinking what does any of this have to do with SQL? Well normally when we draw names we write them on a piece of paper, someone takes a picture, then that gets texted around to other family members. At least for me every October I’m scrolling back through text messages to try to recall who it was I’m supposed to buy for. This year I took a little time to put everyone’s name in a SQL database and write a simple query for easier recall.

Keep reading
Craig Kerstiens

Commenting your Postgres database

Written byBy Craig Kerstiens | October 17, 2018Oct 17, 2018

At Citus whether it’s looking at our own data or helping a customer debug a query I end up writing a lot of SQL. When I do write SQL I do my best to make sure it’s readable in case others need to come along and understand or modify, but admittedly I do have some bad habits from time to time such as using implicit joins. Regardless of my bad habits I still try to make my SQL and database as easy to understand for someone not already familiar with it. One of the biggest tools for that is comments.

Even early on in learning to program we take advantage of comments to explain and describe what our code is doing, even in times when it seems obvious. I see this less commonly in SQL and databases, which is a shame because data is just as valuable so making it easier to reason and work with seems logical. Postgres has a few great mechanisms you can start leveraging when it comes to commenting so you can better document things.

Keep reading
Gary Sahota

Fun with SQL: Unions in Postgres

Written byBy Gary Sahota | September 27, 2018Sep 27, 2018

Before joining the Citus Data team to work on the Postgres extension that transforms Postgres into a distributed database, I checked out the Citus Data blog to learn a bit more. And found all sorts of material for Postgres beginners as well as power users, with one of my favorites being the “Fun with SQL” series. After I joined, I jumped at the chance to write a Fun with SQL post, and the only question was what to write about. I chose unions.

In SQL, the UNION and UNION ALL operators help take multiple tables and combine the results into a single table of all matching columns. This operator is extremely useful if you want the results to come back as a single set of records.

Keep reading

Page 1 of 3