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Umur Cubukcu

Umur Cubukcu

CITUS BLOG AUTHOR PROFILE

Leads the Postgres product team at Microsoft. Co-founder & CEO of Citus Data. Speaker at Strata Data Conference, Ignite, & Microsoft Virtual Open Source Summit. M.S. from Stanford. New dad.

@umurc

PUBLISHED ARTICLES
Umur Cubukcu

Microsoft Acquires Citus Data: Creating the World’s Best Postgres Experience Together

Written by By Umur Cubukcu | January 24, 2019 Jan 24, 2019

Citus Data & Microsoft

Today, I’m very excited to announce the next chapter in our company’s journey: Microsoft has acquired Citus Data.

When we founded Citus Data eight years ago, the world was different. Clouds and big data were newfangled. The common perception was that relational databases were, by design, scale up only—limiting their ability to handle cloud scale applications and big data workloads. This brought the rise of Hadoop and all the other NoSQL databases people were creating at the time. At Citus Data, we had a different idea: that we would embrace the relational database, while also extending it to make it horizontally scalable, resilient, and worry-free. That instead of re-implementing the database from scratch, we would build upon PostgreSQL and its open and extensible ecosystem.

Fast forward to 2019 and today’s news: we are thrilled to join a team who deeply understands databases and is keenly focused on meeting customers where they are. Both Citus and Microsoft share a mission of openness, empowering developers, and choice. And we both love PostgreSQL. We are excited about joining forces, and the value that doing so will create: Delivering to our community and our customers the world’s best PostgreSQL experience.

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Umur Cubukcu

Testing Postgres vectorization for faster aggregations

Written by By Umur Cubukcu | October 7, 2014 Oct 7, 2014

One of the ideas we wanted to explore more has been speeding up in-memory aggregations in PostgreSQL through vectorized execution. The opportunity to do so came up when we had our intern, Can, take this on as a project during his summer internship...

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