If you’re into useful Postgres content, be sure to also check out our sister blog site, the Azure Postgres Blog on Microsoft’s TechCommunity.

Skip navigation

Citus BlogCitus Blog

Thoughts on scaling out PostgreSQL, sharding, multi-tenant apps, real-time analytics, and distributed databases.

Postgres is an amazing RDBMS implementation. Postgres is open source and it’s one of the most standard-compliant SQL implementations that you will find (if not the most compliant.) Postgres is packed with extensions to the standard, and it makes writing and deploying your applications simple and easy. After all, Postgres has your back and manages all the complexities of concurrent transactions for you.

In this post I am excited to announce that a new version of pg_auto_failover has been released, pg_auto_failover 1.4.

pg_auto_failover is an extension to Postgres built for high availability (HA), that monitors and manages failover for Postgres clusters. Our guiding principles from day one have been simplicity and correctness. Since pg_auto_failover is open source, you can find it on GitHub and it’s easy to try out. Let’s walk through what’s new in pg_auto_failover, and let’s explore the new capabilities you can take advantage of.

Keep reading

One common challenge with Postgres for those of you who manage busy Postgres databases, and those of you who foresee being in that situation, is that Postgres does not handle large numbers of connections particularly well.

While it is possible to have a few thousand established connections without running into problems, there are some real and hard-to-avoid problems.

Since joining Microsoft last year in the Azure Database for PostgreSQL team—where I work on open source Postgres—I have spent a lot of time analyzing and addressing some of the issues with connection scalability in Postgres.

Keep reading

When working on the internals of Citus, an open source extension to Postgres that transforms Postgres into a distributed database, we often get to talk with customers that have interesting challenges you won’t find everywhere. Just a few months back, I encountered an analytics workload that was a really good fit for Citus.

But we had one problem: the percentile calculations on their data (over 300 TB of data) could not meet their SLA of 30 seconds.

To make things worse, the query performance was not even close to the target: the percentile calculations were taking about 6 minutes instead of the required 30 second SLA.

Keep reading
Marco Slot

What’s new in the Citus 9.4 extension to Postgres

Written byBy Marco Slot | September 5, 2020Sep 5, 2020

Our latest release to the Citus extension to Postgres is Citus 9.4. If you’re not yet familiar, Citus transforms Postgres into a distributed database, distributing your data and your SQL queries across multiple nodes. This post is basically the Citus 9.4 release notes.

If you’re ready to get started with Citus, it’s easy to download Citus open source packages for 9.4.

I always recommend people check out docs.citusdata.com to learn more. The Citus documentation has rigorous tutorials, details on every Citus feature, explanations of key concepts—things like choosing the distribution column—tutorials on how you can set up Citus locally on a single server, how to install Citus on multiple servers, how to build a real-time analytics dashboard, how to build a multi-tenant database, and more…

Keep reading

Many of you rely on databases to return correct results for your SQL queries, however complex your queries might be. And you probably place your trust with no questions asked—since you know relational databases are built on top of proven mathematical foundations, and since there is no practical way to manually verify your SQL query output anyway.

Since it is possible that a database’s implementation of the SQL logic could have a few errors, database developers apply extensive testing methods to avoid such flaws. For instance, the Citus open source repo on GitHub has more than twice as many lines related to automated testing than lines of database code. However, checking correctness for all possible SQL queries is challenging because of the lack of a “ground truth” to compare their outputs against, and the infinite number of possible SQL queries.

Keep reading
Jeff Davis

How to securely authenticate with SCRAM in Postgres 13

Written byBy Jeff Davis | July 28, 2020Jul 28, 2020

Making security easy to use is crucial because hard-to-use security is likely to be neglected entirely. SCRAM with channel binding is a variation of password authentication that is almost as easy to use, but much more secure.

In basic password authentication, the connecting client simply sends the server the password. Then the server checks that it’s the right one, and allows the client to connect. Basic password authentication has several weaknesses which are addressed with SCRAM and channel binding.

In this article, you’ll learn how to set up authentication using SCRAM with channel binding in Postgres. I implemented the client connection parameter channel_binding in PostgreSQL 13, due to be released in late 2020 (PostgreSQL 13 is in beta now). SCRAM and Channel Binding have already been supported in several releases, but this new connection parameter is necessary to realize the security benefits of SCRAM and Channel Binding

Keep reading

Custom types—called user-defined types in the PostgreSQL docs—are a powerful Postgres capability that, just like Postgres extensions, were envisioned from Day One in the original design of Postgres. Published in 1985, the Design of Postgres paper stated the 2nd design goal as: “provide user extendibility for data types, operators and access methods.”

It’s kind of cool that the creators of Postgres laid the foundation for the powerful Postgres extensions of today (like PostGIS for geospatial use cases, Citus for scaling out Postgres horizontally, pg_partman for time-based partitioning, and so many more Postgres extensions) way back in 1985 when the design of Postgres paper was first published.

Keep reading

Our latest release to the Citus open source extension to Postgres is Citus 9.3.

If you’re a regular reader of the Citus Blog, you already know Citus transforms Postgres into a distributed database, distributing your data and SQL queries across multiple servers. This post—heavily inspired by the internal release notes that lead engineer Marco Slot circulated internally—is all about what’s new & notable in Citus 9.3.

Keep reading

This year, I was so excited about doing a workshop about optimizing Python & Django apps with Postgres superpowers for the PyCon 2020 conference.

Working with other developers on performance is something I always find amazing. So props to the Python people at Microsoft who encouraged my team to create a workshop on Postgres for PyCon 2020. Thank you to Nina Zakharenko, Dan Taylor, & Crystal Kelch.

Alas, we had to change our plans and find other ways to share the PostgreSQL workshop content that we had prepared. So I created a video on the topic of database performance for Django developers, to help teach you the PostgreSQL tips and tricks that have served me well in optimizing my Django apps. These tips are what I call “Postgres superpowers.”

Keep reading

Page 1 of 24