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Citus Blog

Articles tagged: open source

Claire Giordano

What’s new in the Citus 9.5 extension to Postgres

Written byBy Claire Giordano | November 14, 2020Nov 14, 2020

When I gave the kickoff talk in the Postgres devroom at FOSDEM this year, one of the Q&A questions was: “what’s happening with the Citus open source extension to Postgres?” The answer is, a lot. Since FOSDEM, Marco Slot and I have blogged about how Citus 9.2 speeds up large-scale htap workloads on Postgres, the Citus 9.3 release notes, and what’s new in Citus 9.4.

Now it’s time to walk through everything new in the Citus 9.5 open source release.

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One of the unique things about Postgres is that it is highly programmable via PL/pgSQL and extensions. Postgres is so programmable that I often think of Postgres as a computing platform rather than just a database (or a distributed computing platform—with Citus). As a computing platform, I always felt that Postgres should be able to take actions in an automated way. That is why I created the open source pg_cron extension back in 2016 to run periodic jobs in Postgres—and why I continue to maintain pg_cron now that I work on the Postgres team at Microsoft.

Using pg_cron, you can schedule Postgres queries to run periodically, according to the familiar cron syntax. Some typical examples:

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Andres Freund

Improving Postgres Connection Scalability: Snapshots

Written byBy Andres Freund | October 25, 2020Oct 25, 2020

I recently analyzed the limits of connection scalability, to understand the most effective way to improve Postgres’ handling of large numbers of connections, and why that is important. I concluded that the most pressing issue is snapshot scalability.

This post details the improvements I recently contributed to Postgres 14 (to be released Q3 of 2021), significantly reducing the identified snapshot scalability bottleneck.

As the explanation of the implementation details is fairly long, I thought it’d be more fun for of you if I start with the results of the work, instead of the technical details (I’m cheating, I know ;)).

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Postgres is an amazing RDBMS implementation. Postgres is open source and it’s one of the most standard-compliant SQL implementations that you will find (if not the most compliant.) Postgres is packed with extensions to the standard, and it makes writing and deploying your applications simple and easy. After all, Postgres has your back and manages all the complexities of concurrent transactions for you.

In this post I am excited to announce that a new version of pg_auto_failover has been released, pg_auto_failover 1.4.

pg_auto_failover is an extension to Postgres built for high availability (HA), that monitors and manages failover for Postgres clusters. Our guiding principles from day one have been simplicity and correctness. Since pg_auto_failover is open source, you can find it on GitHub and it’s easy to try out. Let’s walk through what’s new in pg_auto_failover, and let’s explore the new capabilities you can take advantage of.

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One common challenge with Postgres for those of you who manage busy Postgres databases, and those of you who foresee being in that situation, is that Postgres does not handle large numbers of connections particularly well.

While it is possible to have a few thousand established connections without running into problems, there are some real and hard-to-avoid problems.

Since joining Microsoft last year in the Azure Database for PostgreSQL team—where I work on open source Postgres—I have spent a lot of time analyzing and addressing some of the issues with connection scalability in Postgres.

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As part of the Citus team (Citus scales out Postgres horizontally, but that’s not all we work on), I’ve been working on pg_auto_failover for quite some time now and I’m excited that we have now introduced pg_auto_failover as Open Source, to give you automated failover and high availability!

When designing pg_auto_failover, our goal was this: to provide an easy to set up Business Continuity solution for Postgres that implements fault tolerance of any one node in the system. The documentation chapter about the pg_auto_failover architecture includes the following:

It is important to understand that pg_auto_failover is optimized for Business Continuity. In the event of losing a single node, then pg_auto_failover is capable of continuing the PostgreSQL service, and prevents any data loss when doing so, thanks to PostgreSQL Synchronous Replication.

Introduction to pg_auto_failover

The pg_auto_failover solution for Postgres is meant to provide an easy to setup and reliable automated failover solution. This solution includes software driven decision making for when to implement failover in production.

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Today, we’re excited to announce that we have donated 1% of Citus Data’s stock to the non-profit PostgreSQL organizations in the US and Europe. The United States PostgreSQL Association (PgUS) has received this stock grant. PgUS will work with PostgreSQL Europe to support the growth, education, and future innovation of Postgres both in the US and Europe.

To our knowledge, this is the first time a company has donated 1% of its equity to support the mission of an open source foundation.

To coincide with this donation, we’re also joining the Pledge 1% movement, alongside well-known technology organizations such as Atlassian, Twilio, Box, and more.

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