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Articles tagged: joins

If you have a large PostgreSQL database that runs on a single node, eventually the single node’s resources—such as memory, CPU, and disk—may deliver query responses that are too slow. That is when you may want to use the Citus extension to Postgres to distribute your tables across a cluster of Postgres nodes.

In your large database, Citus will shine for large tables, since the distributed Citus tables will benefit from the memory across all of the nodes in the cluster. But what if your Postgres database also contains some small tables which easily fit into a single node’s memory? You might be wondering: do you need to distribute these smaller tables, even though there wouldn’t be much performance gain from distributing them?

Fortunately, as of the Citus 10 release, you do not have to choose: you can distribute your large tables across a Citus cluster and continue using your smaller tables as local Postgres tables on the Citus coordinator.

One of the new features in Citus 10 that enables you to use a hybrid “local+distributed” Postgres database is that you can now JOIN local tables and distributed tables. (The other new Citus 10 feature has to do with foreign keys between local and reference tables.)

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Craig Kerstiens

Fun with SQL: Self joins

Written byBy Craig Kerstiens | January 2, 2019Jan 2, 2019

Various families have various traditions in the US around Christmas time. Some will play games like white elephant where you get a mix of decent gifts as well as gag gifts… you then draw numbers and get to pick from existing presents that have been opened (“stealing” from someone else) or opening an up-opened one. The game is both entertaining to try to get something you want, but also stick Aunt Jennifer with the stuffed poop emoji with a Santa hat on it.

Other traditions are a bit simpler, one that my partner’s family follows is drawing names for one person you buy a gift for. This is nice because you can put a bit of effort into that one person without having to be too overwhelmed in tracking down things for multiple people. Each year we draw names for the next year. And by now you’re probably thinking what does any of this have to do with SQL? Well normally when we draw names we write them on a piece of paper, someone takes a picture, then that gets texted around to other family members. At least for me every October I’m scrolling back through text messages to try to recall who it was I’m supposed to buy for. This year I took a little time to put everyone’s name in a SQL database and write a simple query for easier recall.

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Dimitri Fontaine

A history lesson on SQL joins (in Postgres)

Written byBy Dimitri Fontaine | September 25, 2018Sep 25, 2018

Our beloved Structured Query Language may be the lingua franca for relational databases—but like many languages, SQL is in a state of constant evolution. The first releases of SQL didn’t even have a notation for joins. At the time, SQL only supported inner joins.

Cross Joins and Where Filters

As a result, back in early eighties, the only way to express a join condition between tables would be in the WHERE clause.

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Today, we’re excited to announce our latest release of our distributed database—Citus 7.2. With this release, we’re making Citus more of a drop-in replacement for your single-node Postgres database, so you don’t need to adapt your SQL for a distributed system.

For multi-tenant applications where the single-tenant queries were scoped to a single machine, Citus already provided full SQL support. . The improvements in Citus 7.2 take our support for distributed SQL one big step further. With Citus database version 7.2, we now extend our distributed SQL support to queries that run on data spread across a cluster of machines. This becomes particularly important for real-time analytics workloads, where even the most complex SELECT queries need to be parallelized across machines.

If you’re into bulleted lists, here’s the quick overview of what’s new in Citus database version 7.2 for distributed queries that span across machines. For an overview of other recent Citus features check out these blogs about distributed transactions and Citus 7.1.

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Eren Basak

How Distributed Outer Joins on PostgreSQL with Citus Work

Written byBy Eren Basak | October 10, 2016Oct 10, 2016

SQL is a very powerful language for analyzing and reporting against data. At the core of SQL is the idea of joins and how you combine various tables together. One such type of join: outer joins are useful when we need to retain rows, even if it has no match on the other side.

And while the most common type of join, inner join, against tables A and B would bring only the tuples that have a match for both A and B, outer joins give us the ability to bring together from say all of table A even if they don’t have a corresponding match in table B. For example, let’s say you keep customers in one table and purchases in another table. When you want to see all purchases of customers, you may want to see all customers in the result even if they did not do any purchases yet. Then, you need an outer join. Within this post we’ll analyze a bit on what outer joins are, and then how we support them in a distributed fashion on Citus.

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