Learn about Citus on Microsoft Azure in our latest post about use cases: When to use Hyperscale (Citus) to scale out Postgres.

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Claire Giordano

When to use Hyperscale (Citus) to scale out Postgres

Written byBy Claire Giordano | December 5, 2020Dec 5, 2020

If you’ve built your application on Postgres, you already know why so many people love Postgres.

And if you’re new to Postgres, the list of reasons people love Postgres is loooong—and includes things like: 3 decades of database reliability baked in; rich datatypes; support for custom types; myriad index types from B-tree to GIN to BRIN to GiST; support for JSON and JSONB from early days; constraints; foreign data wrappers; rollups; the geospatial capabilities of the PostGIS extension, and all the innovations that come from the many Postgres extensions.

But what to do if your Postgres database gets very large?

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One of the unique things about Postgres is that it is highly programmable via PL/pgSQL and extensions. Postgres is so programmable that I often think of Postgres as a computing platform rather than just a database (or a distributed computing platform—with Citus). As a computing platform, I always felt that Postgres should be able to take actions in an automated way. That is why I created the open source pg_cron extension back in 2016 to run periodic jobs in Postgres—and why I continue to maintain pg_cron now that I work on the Postgres team at Microsoft.

Using pg_cron, you can schedule Postgres queries to run periodically, according to the familiar cron syntax. Some typical examples:

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Ozgun Erdogan

Microsoft Azure Welcomes PostgreSQL Committers

Written byBy Ozgun Erdogan | March 3, 2020Mar 3, 2020

Interview with the Postgres committers who have joined the Postgres team at Microsoft by Sudhakar Sannakkayala (Partner Director, Azure Data) and Ozgun Erdogan (Principal, Azure Data)—cross-posted from the Azure Postgres blog.

In recent years, the data landscape has seen strong innovation as a result of the onset of open source technologies. At the forefront, PostgreSQL has shown that it’s the open source database built for every type of developer. By staying true to its principles of being standards-compliant, highly programmable, and extensible, PostgreSQL has solidified its position as the “most loved database” of developers across the board—ranging from scenarios for OLTP, analytics, and business intelligence to processing various formats of geometric data using the PostGIS extension.

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How do you know if the next update to your software is ready for hundreds of millions of customers? It starts with data. And when it comes to Windows, we’re talking lots of data. The Windows team measures the quality of new software builds by scrutinizing 20,000 diagnostic metrics based on data flowing in from 800 million Windows devices. At the same time, the team evaluates feedback from Microsoft engineers who are using pre-release versions of Windows updates.

At Microsoft, the Windows diagnostic metrics are displayed on a real-time analytics dashboard called “Release Quality View” (RQV), which helps the internal “ship-room” team assess the quality of the customer experience before each new Windows update is released. Given the importance of Windows for Microsoft’s customers, the RQV analytics dashboard is a critical tool for Windows engineers, program managers, and execs.

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For roughly ten years now, I’ve had the pleasure of running and managing databases for people. In the early stages of building an application you move quickly, adding new tables and columns to your Postgres database to support new functionality. You move quickly, but you don’t worry too much because things are fast and responsive–largely because your data is small. Over time your application grows and matures. Your data model stabilizes, and you start to spend more time tuning and tweaking to ensure performance and stability stay where they need to. Eventually you get to the point where you miss the days of maintaining a small database, because life was easier then. Indexes were created quickly, joins were fast, count(*) didn’t bring your database to a screeching halt, and vacuum was not a regular part of your lunchtime conversation. As you continue to tweak and optimize the system, you know you need a plan for the future and know how you’re going to continue to scale.

Now in GA: Introducing Hyperscale (Citus) on Azure Database for PostgreSQL

With Hyperscale (Citus) on Azure Database for PostgreSQL, we help many of those worries fade away. I am super excited to announce that Citus is now available on Microsoft Azure, as a new built-in deployment option on the Azure Database for PostgreSQL called Hyperscale (Citus).

Hyperscale (Citus) scales out your data across multiple physical nodes, with the underlying data being sharded into much smaller bits. The same database sharding principles that work for Facebook and Google are baked right into the database. But, unlike traditional sharded systems, your application doesn’t have to learn how to shard the data. With Azure Database for PostgreSQL, Hyperscale (Citus) takes Postgres, the open source relational database, and extends it with low level internal hooks.

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Citus Data & Microsoft

Today, I’m very excited to announce the next chapter in our company’s journey: Microsoft has acquired Citus Data.

When we founded Citus Data eight years ago, the world was different. Clouds and big data were newfangled. The common perception was that relational databases were, by design, scale up only—limiting their ability to handle cloud scale applications and big data workloads. This brought the rise of Hadoop and all the other NoSQL databases people were creating at the time. At Citus Data, we had a different idea: that we would embrace the relational database, while also extending it to make it horizontally scalable, resilient, and worry-free. That instead of re-implementing the database from scratch, we would build upon PostgreSQL and its open and extensible ecosystem.

Fast forward to 2019 and today’s news: we are thrilled to join a team who deeply understands databases and is keenly focused on meeting customers where they are. Both Citus and Microsoft share a mission of openness, empowering developers, and choice. And we both love PostgreSQL. We are excited about joining forces, and the value that doing so will create: Delivering to our community and our customers the world’s best PostgreSQL experience

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