Citus 10.2 is out! 10.2 brings you new columnar & time series features—and is ready to support Postgres 14. Read the new Citus 10.2 blog.

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Articles tagged: columnar

Burak Velioglu

How to scale Postgres for time series data with Citus

Written byBy Burak Velioglu | October 22, 2021Oct 22, 2021

Managing time series data at scale can be a challenge. PostgreSQL offers many powerful data processing features such as indexes, COPY and SQL—but the high data volumes and ever-growing nature of time series data can cause your database to slow down over time.

Fortunately, Postgres has a built-in solution to this problem: Partitioning tables by time range.

Partitioning with the Postgres declarative partitioning feature can help you speed up query and ingest times for your time series workloads. Range partitioning lets you create a table and break it up into smaller partitions, based on ranges (typically time ranges). Query performance improves since each query only has to deal with much smaller chunks. Though, you’ll still be limited by the memory, CPU, and storage resources of your Postgres server.

The good news is you can scale out your partitioned Postgres tables to handle enormous amounts of data by distributing the partitions across a cluster. How? By using the Citus extension to Postgres. In other words, with Citus you can create distributed time-partitioned tables. To save disk space on your nodes, you can also compress your partitions—without giving up indexes on them. Even better: the latest Citus 10.2 open-source release makes it a lot easier to manage your partitions in PostgreSQL.

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Onder Kalaci

What’s new in the Citus 10.2 extension to Postgres

Written byBy Onder Kalaci | September 17, 2021Sep 17, 2021

Citus 10.2 is out! If you are not yet familiar with Citus, it is an open source extension to Postgres that transforms Postgres into a distributed database—so you can achieve high performance at any scale. The Citus open source packages are available for download. And Citus is also available in the cloud as a managed service, too.

You can see a bulleted list of all the changes in the CHANGELOG on GitHub. This post is your guide to what’s new in Citus 10.2, including some of these headline features.

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There is some good news for those of you wanting to shard your Postgres database in the cloud, so that as your data grows you have an easy way to scale out your Postgres database. I’m delighted to announce that Citus 10—the latest open source release of the Citus extension to Postgres—is now generally available in Hyperscale (Citus).

Hyperscale (Citus) is a built-in option in the Azure Database for PostgreSQL managed service, which has been around for a couple of years to help those of you who would rather focus on your application—and not on spending cycles managing your database.

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It’s been an eventful time for Hyperscale (Citus) lately. If you’re interested in Postgres, distributed databases, and how to handle ever growing needs for your Postgres application or simply use Hyperscale (Citus), keep reading.

Citus is an open source extension to Postgres that enables horizontal scaling of your Postgres database. Citus distributes your Postgres tables, writes, and SQL queries across multiple nodes—parallelizing your workload and enabling you to use the memory, compute, and disk of a multi-node cluster. And Citus is available on Azure: Hyperscale (Citus) is a deployment option in Azure Database for PostgreSQL.

What’s really exciting to me is that we’ve made it easier and cheaper than ever to try and use Hyperscale (Citus). With Basic tier, you can now use Hyperscale (Citus) on a single node, parallelizing your operations and adopting a distributed database model from the very beginning. And you can now try Citus open source with a single docker run command—boom!

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Citus is an extension to Postgres that lets you distribute your application’s workload across multiple nodes. Whether you are using Citus open source or using Citus as part of a managed Postgres service in the cloud, one of the first things you do when you start using Citus is to distribute your tables. While distributing your Postgres tables you need to decide on some properties such as distribution column, shard count, colocation. And even before you decide on your distribution column (sometimes called a distribution key, or a sharding key), when you create a Postgres table, your table is created with an access method.

Previously you had to decide on these table properties up front, and then you went with your decision. Or if you really wanted to change your decision, you needed to start over. The good news is that in Citus 10, we introduced 2 new user-defined functions (UDFs) to make it easier for you to make changes to your distributed Postgres tables.

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Jeff Davis

Citus 10 brings columnar compression to Postgres

Written byBy Jeff Davis | March 6, 2021Mar 6, 2021

Citus 10 is out! Check out the Citus 10 blog post for all the details. Citus is an open source extension to Postgres (not a fork) that enables scale-out, but offers other great features, too. See the Citus docs and the Citus github repo and README.

This post will highlight Citus Columnar, one of the big new features in Citus 10. You can also take a look at the columnar documentation. Citus Columnar can be used with or without the scale-out features of Citus.

Postgres typically stores data using the heap access method, which is row-based storage. Row-based tables are good for transactional workloads, but can cause excessive IO for some analytic queries.

Columnar storage is a new way to store data in a Postgres table. Columnar groups data together by column instead of by row; and compresses the data, too. Arranging data by column tends to compress well, and it also means that queries can skip over columns they don’t need. Columnar dramatically reduces the IO needed to answer a typical analytic query—often by 10X!

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Development on Citus first started around a decade ago and once a year we release a major new Citus open source version. We wanted to make number 10 something special, but I could not have imagined how truly spectacular this release would become. Citus 10 extends Postgres (12 and 13) with many new superpowers:

  • Columnar storage for Postgres: Compress your PostgreSQL and Citus tables to reduce storage cost and speed up your analytical queries.
  • Sharding on a single Citus node: Make your single-node Postgres server ready to scale out by sharding tables locally using Citus.
  • Shard rebalancer in Citus open source: We have open sourced the shard rebalancer so you can easily add Citus nodes and rebalance your cluster.
  • Joins and foreign keys between local PostgreSQL tables and Citus tables: Mix and match PostgreSQL and Citus tables with foreign keys and joins.
  • Functions to change the way your tables are distributed: Redistribute your tables in a single step using new alter table functions.
  • Much more: Better naming, improved SQL & DDL support, simplified operations.

These new capabilities represent a fundamental shift in what Citus is and what Citus can do for you.

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