Citus Blog

Articles tagged: vacuum

Samay Sharma

Debugging Postgres autovacuum problems: 13 tips

Written byBy Samay Sharma | July 28, 2022Jul 28, 2022

If you’ve been running PostgreSQL for a while, you’ve heard about autovacuum. Yes, autovacuum, the thing which everybody asks you not to turn off, which is supposed to keep your database clean and reduce bloat automatically.

And yet—imagine this: one fine day, you see that your database size is larger than you expect, the I/O load on your database has increased, and things have slowed down without much change in workload. You begin looking into what might have happened. You run the excellent Postgres bloat query and you notice you have a lot of bloat. So you run the VACUUM command manually to clear the bloat in your Postgres database. Good!

But then you have to address the elephant in the room: why didn’t Postgres autovacuum clean up the bloat in the first place…? Does the above story sound familiar? Well, you are not alone. 😊

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David Rowley

Speeding up recovery & VACUUM in Postgres 14

Written byBy David Rowley | March 25, 2021Mar 25, 2021

One of the performance projects I’ve focused on in PostgreSQL 14 is speeding up PostgreSQL recovery and vacuum. In the PostgreSQL team at Microsoft, I spend most of my time working with other members of the community on the PostgreSQL open source project. And in Postgres 14 (due to release in Q3 of 2021), I committed a change to optimize the compactify_tuples function, to reduce CPU utilization in the PostgreSQL recovery process. This performance optimization in PostgreSQL 14 made our crash recovery test case about 2.4x faster.

The compactify_tuples function is used internally in PostgreSQL:

  • when PostgreSQL starts up after a non-clean shutdown—called crash recovery
  • by the recovery process that is used by physical standby servers to replay changes (as described in the write-ahead log) as they arrive from the primary server
  • by VACUUM

So the good news is that the improvements to compactify_tuples will: improve crash recovery performance; reduce the load on the standby server, allowing it to replay the write-ahead log from the primary server more quickly; and improve VACUUM performance.

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